IELTS ( week 3)


The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) measures the language proficiency of people who want to study or work where English is used as a language of communication. It uses a nine-band scale to clearly identify levels of proficiency, from non-user (band score 1) through to expert (band score 9). IELTS Academic or IELTS General Training

IELTS is available in two test versions: Academic – for people applying for higher education or professional registration, and General Training for those migrating to Australia, Canada and the UK, or applying for secondary education, training programmes and work experience in an English-speaking environment. Both versions provide a valid and accurate assessment of the four language skills: listening, reading, writing and speaking. 

Cheetah ( week 2 )

The cheetah is the world’s fastest land mammal. With acceleration that would leave most automobiles in the dust, a cheetah can go from 0 to 60 miles an hour in only three seconds. These big cats are quite nimble at high speed and can make quick and sudden turns in pursuit of prey.

Speed and Hunting
Before unleashing their speed, cheetahs use exceptionally keen eyesight to scan their grassland environment for signs of prey—especially antelope and hares. This big cat is a daylight hunter that benefits from stealthy movement and a distinctive spotted coat that allows it to blend easily into high, dry grasses.
When the moment is right a cheetah will sprint after its quarry and attempt to knock it down. Such chases cost the hunter a tremendous amount of energy and are usually over in less than a minute. If successful, the cheetah will often drag its kill to a shady hiding place to protect it from opportunistic animals that sometimes steal a kill before the cheetah can eat. Cheetahs need only drink once every three to four days.

Child’s Best Friend: Kids Prefer Their Pets Over Siblings ( week 1)

Dogs may be man’s best friend, but a new study finds that pets are children’s best friends, too more so than their own siblings.

The research does not suggest pets can replace siblings, but rather offers more information about how family pets can influence the development and well-being of children. Though the study looked at only 77 children in the United Kingdom, the findings add to a growing body of research about the role that pets play in people’s lives.
In Western households, pets are almost as common as siblings, but according to the researchers, there are few studies on the importance of child-pet relationships. 
“Anyone who has loved a childhood pet knows that we turn to them for companionship and disclosure, just like relationships between people,” study lead author Matt Cassells, a psychiatry Ph.D. student at the University of Cambridge, said in a statement. “We wanted to know how strong these relationships are with pets relative to other close family ties. Ultimately this may enable us to understand how animals contribute to healthy child development.”